Travelling in the time of Coronavirus 6- Tides and Time

Travelling in the time of Coronavirus 6- Tides and Time

Low tide and high tide Rye Harbour

As humanity sits in lockdown

Seemingly hibernating

Time standing still the world and tides rise and fall

River entrance low and high tide

And for many life goes on almost unabated

The fisherman returning of the flood tide after another night alone on the Celtic Sea

The flood tide filling the river and spreading out over the salt marsh

For the fisherman every night is social distance

Alone with on the end less waves, the sky and sea birds for companionship

The tides of time go on ebbing and flowing like the water round the old wreck

Ebbing and flowing in time less motion

Last night over the Celtic Sea the Easter Pink Supermoon rose

In a sort of bright isolated orb in the darkness

Casting it’s beam like a stream of rose gold

Like it has for millenea.

Rye Harbour pier low and high tide

And the tides keep turning

Back in Beautiful Brittany

Back in Beautiful Brittany

There was something strange about getting on the Normandy Express in Portsmouth

Was it deja vu?

But yes this fast cat was built in Tasmania Australia and used to cross Bass Strait

It was an omen of positive things to come.

First stop was beautiful Mont St Michel at the northern part of Brittany.

The beautiful coast and farm land around the northern coast

On the west coast

The sunsets

The little coves

And in July it’s mussel season so fresh and sweet

South of Brest there is Camaret sur Mer an historic fishing town

The maritime city still a working port and welcoming to tourists

With beautiful beaches and great motorcycling roads near by.

Bet really it’s the little ports of Brittany that catch my eye.

Riding the Wild Atlantic Way – Ireland

Riding the Wild Atlantic Way – Ireland

Mizen Head is the most southern most point of mainland Ireland

As good as place as any to start the Wild Atlantic Way

They even give you a starting line

The route winds up the west coast

Through foggy Irish mist

Bantry Bay

Mizen Head

Over mountains with wonderous views

Mountains where Irish legends such as Finn Mc Cool sat.

A coast where there are fishing villages both small

And big

With cliffs towering out of the sea

Relics of stone age and Celtic history dating back 5000 years

Quintessential Irish pubs

Sandy beaches

And then at the end

After 6 days of challenging riding

At Malin Head the most northern point of mainland Ireland

They provide a finish line

Cross the Celtic Sea. Are they spirits of the past calling?

Cross the Celtic Sea. Are they spirits of the past calling?

It was a misty night

As the ferry left Cherbourg

The next day the emerald isle.

My forebares left on an immigrant ship

More than 140 years ago

Driven out by desperation and hunger

And I’m on the car ferry from France

During the night the sky cleared and moon cast her silver light upon the sea

And at Rosslare the sun was shining it’s welcome.

The Irish on board were talking about how good it was to be back home

Its not my home but the blue blue sea and the emerald hills sure tug at the heart strings

Back on the Celtic Ray

Back on the Celtic Ray

Back in Glasgow

The light

The buildings have a new feel

Sight

Texture

I’ve been touched by the Celtic Ray (the Awen)

Harris Tweed Cap made on the Shetland Islands

‘Ireland, Scotland, Brittany and Wales
I can hear the mothers’ voices calling
“Children, children, children”

Listen Jimmy! I want to go home.
Listen Jimmy! I want to go home.
I’ve been away from the Ray too long
I’ve been away from the Ray too long’ – words by Van Morrison

My heritage is Irish, my great grand parents migrating to Kalgoorlie in the 1890s

Part of the Irish diaspora.

But spending time in the north of Scotland has put me on the Celtic Ray

John O’Groats

Fishing harbour John O’Groats

Touched by the Celtic Ray

Glasgow has a new light.

I found the Glasgow Enlightenment

And the fact the the world’s first Afro-American doctor was trained in Glasgow by slavery abolitionists. He was James Mcune-Smith.

I have been away from the Ray too long